Entries by Cameron A. Sterling

Is a CRN Number Required? When and Why.

Well, hopefully this won’t sound repetitive, but CRN registration is required unless an exemption or Variance applies!  Requirements vary by province/territory – some regions have specific exemptions and others have more general ones.  Alberta has an entire regulation devoted to some exemptions.  See this article for more . And, of course, CRN registration is required […]

When Should I Apply For a CRN? And Why.

When should a CRN application be made?  This is a common question. After all, knowing when you should apply for a CRN number is important. Some people only want to know what they ‘must’ do, and they want to know the difference between requirements and suggestions. And though ‘should’ apply for a CRN really means […]

Responsibility for CRN Numbers and Safety

In this space, some questions posed by customers and industry are published in case others have similar questions. Anonymity is preserved. Check back for updates and new correspondence. Dear Cammar, If a vessel, fitting, boiler design, or some pressure piping not meeting the legislation requirements and/or that is simply not registered with a CRN number […]

Bleed Ring Design Responsibility Q&A

In this space, some questions posed by customers and industry are published in case others have similar questions. Anonymity is preserved. Check back for updates and new correspondence. Dear Cammar, Does ABSA require that bleed rings be registered or not? I don’t see anything in the pressure equipment safety regulation that exempts bleed rings from […]

How much does a CRN Cost?

The biggest CRN cost might surprise you.  Marketing and operation delays end up costing much more than CRN application and regulator costs. Regulators’ bills aren’t the biggest thing. The regulator will charge as little as about $150CAD or much, much more. Poorly prepared applications for CRN registration will be either rejected, or subjected to a […]

Generic CRN Registration

It makes the most sense to include as many options as possible in a generic CRN registration to minimize the frequency of applications. In general, it is up to the applicant how they want to organize their CRN registration applications in accordance with model numbers, equipment use, markets, etc. To help optimize the registration process, […]

CRN Renewal Q&A

In this space, some questions posed by customers and industry are published in case others have similar questions. Anonymity is preserved. Check back for updates and new correspondence. Dear Cammar, We have a fitting CRN for some equipment in Alberta and a second Canada wide fitting CRN that originated in Ontario for different models of […]

Harmonizing CRN Process Benefits Q&A

In this space, some questions posed by customers and industry are published in case others have similar questions. Anonymity is preserved. Check back for updates and new correspondence. Dear Cammar, I read your article about harmonizing the CRN process, in which it is stated that we need CRN’s. I am puzzled about the benefit to […]

Harmonized CRN Registration and Public Safety

Have you ever tried to sing along with the radio? Sometimes, harmony just doesn’t happen easily. Now, consider 13 people trying to sing along to the same tune. For them to sing in harmony, even with the same music, they would need to work at it quite a bit. But, I digress.

To get a Canada wide CRN (Canadian Registration Number), applications to 13 separate jurisdictions need to be considered and a comparable number of separate, independent regulatory reviews are required. Why? Well, in short, each province or territory in Canada is constitutionally responsible for legislation about public safety within their boundaries. Hence, time for parallel and separate reviews, then separate and additive fees, and then separate registrations, etc. are currently required. In this day and age, when ideas can flash around the globe at a key stroke, national CRN registration of designs (i.e. ideas) in Canada seems to be, well, quite awkward and glacial in December.

This is not to say that regulators do a bad job. On the contrary, they are needed, appreciated, and certainly do contribute to the safety of the populace by helping owners of equipment (users, manufacturers, distributors, etc.) meet safety requirements. Indeed, regulators are of particular im